Healthy Competitive Sports

There’s a lot of controversy about the value of encouraging children to play competitive amateur sports.

There’s a lot of controversy about the value of encouraging children to play competitive amateur sports. For some of us, that this is even a subject for debate is counter-intuitive and not a little bizarre. Sports build character. It’s axiomatic. But there is healthy competition, which enriches the lives and development of children, and unhealthy, win-at-all-costs competition. How do we encourage and support the former, while avoiding the unfortunate consequences of the latter?

This week, we’ll take a look at what to avoid and what to encourage in kids’ healthy competitive sports. The answer to competition’s dark side- the win-at-all-costs, hate your enemy extremes- is not to abandon competition altogether, but to find and support what’s best in the game.

Then, we’ll identify the key element of keeping sports clean and look into ways to leverage modern technology to encourage, rather than discourage, athletics and competition.

Having a healthy, physical outlet for our kids has never been more important. Stick around for a week of discussion and advice around the theme of encouraging healthy competitive sports for kids.

Floyd of Rosedale Trophy

While the victor at the French Open takes home a replica this year’s Grand Prix trophy is awarded, there is one unique, irreplaceable trophy of which only the replica remains

While the victor at the French Open takes home a replica this year’s Grand Prix trophy is awarded, there is one unique, irreplaceable trophy of which only the replica remains:  Floyd the pig.

Before there was a Floyd of Rosedale Trophy, given annually to the winner of the Iowa-Minnesota college football game, there was a live, snorting prize hog called Floyd of Rosedale, named for the governor of Minnesota and the Iowa farm where the animal once lived.

Floyd’s career as a living trophy was a short one. He was the price of a wager on the 1935 Hawkeyes/Gophers game between Governor Clyde Herring of Iowa and Minnesota Governor Floyd B. Olson, but died of cholera a year after the game.

Sports athletes are among the most competitive bunch of people – especially if they are fighting for one of the most coveted trophies of all time. In the case of Minnesota and Iowa football fans, this has to be the Floyd of Rosedale – a trophy that has been passed from one team to the other over the years. Find out more about the importance of this title to the players and their fans from Tyler Mason’s article.

Other strange trophies exist. Two football teams fight it out for a cannon. Yes, it’s true – the prize awarded to the winning team is a 545 pound gun with a fifty-five millimeter barrel. How in the world did that happen? ‘Fremont Cannon Among Many Odd Rivalry Trophies in College Football’ by Dave Toplikar explains the history behind the cannon and also writes about several other strange trophies.

The Musketeers Cup

La Coupe des Mousquetaires (“The Cup of the Musketeers”) is the trophy awarded to the men’s singles winner of the French Open.

The Musketeers Cup or La Coupe des Mousquetaires is the trophy awarded to the men’s singles winner of the French Open. No one will ever victory-dive into a pool with this beauty, however:  the winner is granted the singular honor of gently handling the trophy for a few moments before returning it to protective custody.

Once a year, on the day of the final, the original cup leaves the office of the President of the Federation for just few hours: the winner takes only a replica home with him. But it is a beauty of a replica!

Every year silversmiths devote over a hundred hours’ work to making the Musketeers Cup replica, which is slightly smaller than the original, transforming a simple sheet of solid silver into a work of art. The metal tamers take a month in the workshop to perform this task – a thing of beauty.

Pinewood Derby is More Than Victory

The Pinewood Derby gives many young men their first taste of public recognition for personal achievement.

The Pinewood Derby gives many young men their first taste of public recognition for personal achievement. It’s not just a race, however; as each Scout designs, builds, paints, and races their own car, there are dozens of opportunities for each contestant to distinguish themselves. Many former Scouts we know, despite having outgrown their little blue uniform decades past, still make room on their award shelf for those first boyhood pinewood derby trophies and awards. Consider this, from the BSA leadership training module on hosting a Pinewood Derby competition:

A key element of Cub Scouting is recognition of personal achievement rather than simple victory. We do this by providing a way of recognizing the achievement of each boy rather than simply celebrating the car that was fastest down the track.

You can recognize craftsmanship, paint jobs, funny cars (cars built to look like bedsteads or forest animals), stock car racers, Indy cars, or even give the Cub Scouts a ballot and have them pick a Cub’s choice. When you consider first-, second-, and third-place winners in each category, you can see that it is easy to spread recognition as wide as you wish it to be. There are no limits to your creativity in creating recognition for the Cub Scout.

Achievement is more that coming in first, second, or third. It is a matter of distinguishing yourself by way of personal effort and ambition, in any category.

Making a Case for Glass Awards

Awards and trophies are a pretty well established routine in many companies. Employers of all shapes and sizes from industries of all sorts have learned that rewarding their employees with tokens of their appreciation has many positive results.

Awards and trophies are a pretty well established routine in many companies. Employers of all shapes and sizes from industries of all sorts have learned that rewarding their employees with tokens of their appreciation has many positive results. Such acknowledgements often result in more of the desired behavior as well as boosting the morale of the employees. In addition, these types of rewards can often foster a bit of friendly competition among employees as they try to top one another’s achievements.

Choosing Glass Awards

CRY003M.smallThere are a number of different types of trophies and awards that can be chosen. Plaques can be hung up on a wall. Pens have a useful purpose as well. But crystal and glass awards bring a bit of a classy look to an event. Due to the vibrancy of crystal, it can provide a welcome addition to any room of the employee’s home. Since glass tends to capture the light in the room where it is located, such an award often draws the attention of the people in the room. This built in conversation piece allows the employee to share in their recognition with family and friends outside of their place of employment and with those people who are not members of their immediate family.

This article, from Lincoln Davis at selfgrowth.com, the online self improvement community, points out the many reasons why an employee might want to receive glass achievement awards instead of some other types of awards. One of the top reasons is that these types of awards can give the employee a tangible reminder of the appreciation that is felt by their employer.

New Ideas for Old Trophies

On this Disney discussion board, someone put the question out there on what to do with their old trophies and awards.

What can you do with old trophies and awards? For many people, acquiring trophies and awards of all sorts is a rite of childhood. From school awards for perfect attendance and reaching reading goals to trophies marking play time in the pee wee soccer league or being noticed as the Most Improved Player, it isn’t unusual to reach adulthood and realize you’ve amassed quite the collection. What can be a bit challenging and stressful is deciding what to do with all those glittering decorative items.

To Keep or Not to Keep, That is the Question

At the Unclutterer.com website, the focus is on helping people unclutter their lives. So it seems that this would be the perfect place to turn to if you want ideas on how to repurpose your old trophies or recycle those outdated school awards. And it is. However, it does this with a twist.

In this article, the first order of business is to decide which, if any, of your old trophies and awards you want to keep. By answering two simple questions, you can easily pare down your collection. If you want to display the item or if it inspires you, it’s a keeper. Otherwise, find another place for it to live.

Landfill Alternatives

Instead of tossing them all in the trash, however, this article has a couple of suggestions. You could call your local government recycling program or your local recycling center.  You can also call the business that made the trophy, award or medal and ask if they participate in a program that allows for recycling.

Josh Peterson, from The Learning Channel, outlines a few different places where you might be able to donate those old trophies and awards that have been piling up in your attic or basement. If you are the environmentally conscious sort, you won’t want to miss his informative post that details how to keep these mementos out of your local landfill.

Source:http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/donate-trophies.htm

Are you looking for a truly unique way to recycle all those old sports trophies and awards? Kate Pruitt shows you how to do it on the DesignSponge website. In this DIY article, the figurines that make up the vast majority of sports trophies are used as a unique way to hang up jackets, coats and hats.

Source: http://www.designsponge.com/2011/05/diy-project-vintage-trophy-coat-rack.html

On this Disney discussion board, someone put the question out there on what to do with their old trophies and awards. The wide range of different, and unique, answers will likely spark an idea or two of your own so you can enjoy a more simplified existence and a more streamlined display.

There are many things that can be done with old trophies and awards besides sending them to the landfill. Just a little creative thought can find a home for them!

Participation Trophies and Awards

One of the ongoing discussions in youth sports involves the matter of trophies and awards for participation.

One of the ongoing discussions in youth sports involves the matter of participation trophies and awards – trophies awarded for participation in a sport or event. There are valid arguments for each side of the issue as this blog post from Sports Signup reveals. Which side of the debate do you find yourself on? Perhaps you will read something that will sway your feelings one way or another.

Many coaches and parents feel that children should not receive awards at the end of the season simply for showing up to the games and practices. Those sorts of rewards should be reserved for those kids who make extraordinary contributions to the team. In their eyes, handing out awards for participation cheapens the contributions of those kids who go above and beyond.

Trophies and Awards Aren’t Harmful

On the other side of the debate are the parents and coaches who feel that such participation awards and trophies are not harmful in any way. Their argument is that they encourage young players to feel like they are part of a team. This can be just the push that a reluctant child needs to try a new sport or to show up for practices each day. Other types of trophies and awards can be handed out to those players who made a big contribution to the team as well.

Cup Trophy

In this blog post on the Outside the Lines website, opposing views on the hotly debated topic of automatic sports trophies and awards that are received

by a child simply for participating are presented. Where do you stand on the topic? Do you see validity in both sides of the argument?

Source: http://blog.sportssignup.com/blog/bid/174702/Should-Youth-Sports-Give-Everyone-a-Trophy

This article debates a question that often plagues coaches, particularly when it comes to games with younger children who might be experiencing team sports for the first time. Should all children receive trophies and awards is the question that sparks a great deal of debate. Read it and decide for yourself.

Source: http://www.createdebate.com/debate/show/Should_all_children_recieve_a_trophy_or_medal_in_sporting_events_despite_losing

Personally, I think there is a place for Participation Awards – it’s not an All or Nothing argument. Youth athletes, particularly those just starting in a sport, should be encouraged and rewarded for going to practice and at least making an effort. And they should be encouraged to play and act like a team – Isn’t that what team sports are all about? And if the team wins or fails, they do so together, and giving them a pat on the back with a participation trophy for giving it their best is very appropriate.

As they get older, and they recognize that trophies are special and need to be earned by trying harder and being better, then participation trophies should give way to championship trophies and individual awards for MVP, most improved, etc. We should give kids some credit – they do know the difference. But even when they are older, participation trophies are very appropriate for division, regional, and state tournaments. Just making it to the “next level” is well worth recognizing.

Car Show Trophies and Awards

A lot goes into planning a car show. The organizer wants to make it a worthwhile experience for both the people who bring their cars to participate, as well as those people who come as spectators.

A lot goes into planning a car show.  The organizer wants to make it a worthwhile experience for both the people who bring their cars to participate, as well as those people who come as spectators. In fact, without the car enthusiasts, there would be no car show to begin with. Fortunately, the type of people who have cars that are out of the ordinary are the type that like to show them off. Collecting car show trophies and awards, as well as plaques is one way they get gratification from their collections.

Source: http://www.ehow.com/way_5406414_car-show-planning.html

Major Sports Awards and Trophies

In the world of sports, outstanding performances by teams and individual players are often rewarded with recognition, fame, awards, and trophies.

In the world of sports, some of the sports awards and trophies are more recognized than the teams and individual players who win them. Below are the biggest sports awards and trophies in professional hockey, basketball, soccer, football, baseball, golf, and other sports:

Stanley Cup

The winning team in each NHL season is presented with the Stanley Cup, a 35.25” tall and 34.5 pound trophy which was donated by Lord Stanley back in 1892. To this day, it remains the oldest major trophy that professional teams and athletes compete for in all of North America. The winning team’s players’ names are engraved on the trophy.

FIFA World Cup Trophy

The winning team in the World Cup (soccer) is presented with the FIFA World Cup Trophy. The Cup is given every four years and the trophy has been a tradition in sports that first started back in 1974, replacing the Jules Rimet Trophy (an award permanently given to Brazil after being the first ever country to win three times in the said competition back in 1970).

Vince Lombardi Trophy

The winning football team in the Super Bowl is presented with the Vince Lombardi Trophy. This award was originally called the World Championship Game Trophy. It was renamed after Vince Lombardi, the iconic coach of the Green Bay Packers, when he died in 1970. The said coach won the first two Super Bowl titles for the Packers in 1967 and 1968.

Larry O’Brien Trophy

The winners of THE NBA playoffs are presented with the Larry O’Brien Trophy. The trophy, which stands at about two feet tall and weighs almost 16 pounds, was originally called the NBA Championship Trophy in 1978 but renamed later in 1984 after Larry O’Brien, a former NBA Commissioner. Tiffany & Co. creates a new trophy each year for the NBA.

Commissioner’s Trophy

The emerging champions of the MLB’s World Series are awarded the Commissioner’s Trophy. The first ever award was given back in 1967 (St. Louis Cardinals – Boston Red Sox championship games). There are 30 flags on the trophy, representative of every one of the league’s teams. The trophy is made from sterling silver, and is the only one of all four major sports league trophies in America that is not named after a person.

Other Major Trophies

  • Claret Jug – Awarded to the British Open (golf) winner
  • William Webb Ellis Trophy – Awarded to the Rugby Union World Cup winner
  • Heisman Trophy – Awarded to college football’s best player (annually)
  • James Naismith Trophy – Awarded to the college basketball’s best player

Wearable Trophies

Not all awards in sports are in the form of trophies. Some come in the likes of medals, certificates, and even jackets. Despite the form they come in, these are huge honors for different athletes in the world of sports.

  • Olympic Medals – Awarded to the winner of the Olympic games, once every four years. These medals became world-wide awards for world-wide competitions since 1896.
  • The Green Jacket – Winners of the PGA Masters tournament are awarded a green jacket since 1937. The previous year’s champion traditionally presents the next champion with this prestiged award.

There are different awards and trophies for all kinds of sports. Here, we highlighted those given to outstanding athletes in the NBA, NHL, MLB, Super Bowl, and the soccer FIFA World Cup, among other major awards in the Olympics, golf and collegiate level. College athletes who are recognized early on often make it to the big leagues later in their career. These are representations of the hard work and success achieved by athletes and teams, often a good source of motivation and encouragement during each season of playing.

Displaying Trophies and Awards

Trophies and awards are proof of your brilliance and can help you make a great first impression on potential clients, add to your reputation

Trophies and awards are proof of your brilliance and can help you make a great first impression on potential clients, add to your reputation, draw admiration or envy from anyone who looks at them. With all these benefits you can get out of your accumulated medals and awards, it’s unwise to have them lying forgotten under a pile of old junk or thrown higgledy-piggledy on some obscure shelf. Here’s some tips on displaying trophies and awards for the best effect.

Instead, follow these great tips by Megan Allen to let your trophies reflect your shining achievements.

Decide which room you want the trophies and medals displayed in. Choose a prominent shelf for yachievement awardour trophies and a wall for your medals, preferably one overlooking the entrance to the room. Position the trophies in a way that the tallest ones are at the back and shorter ones in front.

Place your medals in a shadow box. Shadow boxes are framed boxes that are deep enough to hold items and are great for displaying medals and even trophies.

Adding lights over the shelves and shadow boxes will spotlight your awards and add to the interest. You can use small battery operated lights – the stick-on type. For enhancing the display, you can also add framed photographs of yourself receiving the awards.